Firefox vs Microsoft Edge


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Firefox
The free, non-profit browser for your desktop and mobile devices. Firefox is created by a global non-profit dedicated to putting individuals in control online. We’ve always designed Firefox to protect and respect your private information. That’s why we’re proud to be voted the Most Trusted Internet Company for Privacy.
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Microsoft Edge
Search faster in the address bar. No need to go to a website to search for pictures of adorable penguins. Stay put and save time by entering your search in the handy address bar. You’ll get search suggestions, results from the web, your browsing history, and favorites right on the spot. Microsoft Edge is the only browser that lets you take notes, write, doodle, and highlight directly on webpages. Add a few secret ingredients to a recipe right on the screen to share with your fellow amateur chefs, collaborate on a new project with your coworkers, or have fun with your kids—the web is your palette.
Face to face in the news:


2015 - Microsoft’s new browser will be called Edge to compete with Firefox



So the Internet Explorer's replacement in Windows 10 will be called Microsoft Edge. It will be the minimalistic "chrome-free" web browser "built for doing" - with "built-in note taking and sharing" a slide stated. Edge will also support extensions that are designed for Firefox and Chrome with just a few modifications and have its voice assistant Cortana directly integrated. While Cortana will be baked into Windows 10 at a system-wide level, it will work a little differently in Microsoft Edge. For starters, Cortana in Microsoft Edge doesn't talk to you at all. When you type certain keywords into the address bar or select topics on a website, it'll spring into action, serving up relevant information such as the weather, maps and other nuggets in a window pane. Microsoft Edge will ship with Windows 10 when it launches later this year.

2015 - Firefox gets built-in video chat to stand out over Microsoft Edge



The latest version of Firefox (35) features a WebRTC-based Firefox Hello video chat service. You can start this plugin-free video chat by sharing an automatically generated link with whoever you want to talk to or by using the contacts from your Firefox account to start calls. Before, you had to sit and wait for your contact to join the room. Your contacts can be on Firefox, Chrome or Opera. Now, a small window with a self-view pops up and you can continue to surf the Web until your contact joins the call. Over time, Mozilla wants to expand this project to also include new features like screen sharing and online collaboration tools “so people can be more productive and get the most out of their video calls.” The organization is working with Telefonica’s TokBox and its OpenTok service on this project.