Google App Engine vs Google Cloud Platform


40
Google App Engine
Google App Engine lets you run web applications on Google's infrastructure. App Engine applications are easy to build, easy to maintain, and easy to scale as your traffic and data storage needs grow. With App Engine, there are no servers to maintain: You just upload your application, and it's ready to serve your users.
45
Google Cloud Platform
Google Cloud Platform is a set of modular cloud-based services that allow you to create anything from simple websites to complex applications. Cloud Platform provides the building blocks so you can quickly develop everything from simple websites to complex applications. Explore how you can make Cloud Platform work for you.

Latest news about Google App Engine and Google Cloud Platform:



14.03.17. Google App Engine now supports all programming languages. Google launched the new version of its platform-as-a-service for building application backends App Engine.The big news is that App Engine now supports any programming language, so a developer can create the app in whatever language they are comfortable using. Google sees this as a game changer, making the platform more open, which is a big theme with the company as it transitions to try and lure enterprise customers to Google Cloud Platform in general. In the previous version there was a limited set of runtime libraries and once you built an application, it was very difficult to take it out of Google. The company has indicated that part of its philosophy on being open means making it easy to move and avoid lock-in, even if that means leaving Google Cloud Platform.



13.03.17. Google Cloud Platform improved its free tier. Google launched an improved always-free tier and trial program for its Cloud Platform. The free tier, which now offers enough power to run a small app in Google’s cloud, now allows for free usage of a small (f1-micro) instance in Compute Engine, Cloud Pub/Sub, Google Cloud Storage and Cloud Functions. In total, the free tier now includes 15 services. The addition of the Compute Engine instance and 5GB of free Cloud Storage usage is probably the most important update here because those are, after all, the services that are at the core of most cloud applications. You can find the exact limits here. With this move, Google is clearly stepping up its attacks against AWS, which offers a similar but more limited free tier program for its users.



02.02.17. Google Cloud Platform takes on Windows Azure with new Windows VMs. Google announced several new products today aimed at luring IT pros who are using Windows in their data centers to the Google Cloud Platform. The company introduced support for Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise and Windows Server Core on the Cloud Platform. In addition, the company announced support for SQL Server Always-On Availability Group for customers who are concerned about high availability and disaster recovery when running critical operations in a cloud setting. What this means in practical terms is that IT pros can now launch pre-configured virtual machines running any of these products on Google Cloud Platform, and pay for them by the minute — or they can bring an existing SQL Server license they have already paid for.



12.01.17. Google Cloud Platform gets a new key management service. Google Cloud Platform is launching a new key management service, that will help enterprises, especially in regulated industries like healthcare and banking, to create, use, rotate and destroy their encryption keys in the cloud. Enterprises have traditionally managed their keys on-premise, but as they have slowly moved more of their workloads to the cloud, they have also started thinking about how they can manage their keys in the cloud, too. With the AWS Key Management Service and Azure Key Vault, Amazon and Microsoft have long offered a similar tool, for example, and even Google itself already offered a more basic version of Cloud KMS for users who wanted to supply their own encryption keys.



24.10.16. Google Cloud Platform gets new a cold storage service. Google launched Coldline - a new cold storage service for data archiving and disaster recovery (an alternative to Amazon Glacier). Google Cloud Storage already offered the similar service Nearline. But when Nearline came out of beta earlier this year, it also became much faster. Instead of three to five seconds of latency, access to data was now real-time. So, Coldline basically fills the gap that the improved Nearline service left after it came out of beta. Coldline storage will only cost $0.007 per gigabyte per month (and $0.05 per gigabyte retrieved). Nearline costs $0.01 per month. That may not look like a huge difference, but those numbers quickly add up if you are storing massive amounts of data.



20.11.15. Google launched custom machine types for its Cloud Platform. Google Cloud Platform launched a new way of buying virtual machines in its cloud - Custom Machine Types. With new Custom Machine Types, Google lets you specify exactly how many vCPUs (up to 32) and how much memory you need (up to 6.5 GiB per vCPU — Google likes to be precise, so it doesn’t use ‘gigabyte’ and instead specifies the number of gibibytes). If your needs change — as they inevitably will — you can adjust the number of cores and memory as needed. Maybe you’ve outgrown the virtual machine with two vCPUs. Typically, you would have to step up to a machine type with four vCPUs, even if you only needed three. Because you don’t have a choice, you end up paying for more power than you need.



31.01.15. VMware will make Google Cloud Platform available to its customers. Google is teaming up with VMware to make select Google Cloud Platform services available to VMware customers via vCloud Air, VMware’s hybrid cloud platform. Google BigQuery analytics and Google Cloud Storage, as well as Google’s Datastore and DNS services, will be available via vCloud Air sometime later this year, with other Google services potentially coming later. Depending on execution, both companies can claim a win here. VMware gets four Google services, including the powerful BigQuery analytics, to woo enterprise customers. Google gets to put some of its best and brightest IP in front of the enterprise cloud users it craves. Google needs a better hybrid cloud picture and VMware needs to prove its cloud can play with the big boys (or boy, meaning Amazon Web Services).



24.01.15. Google Cloud Platform now allows to store Docker container images. Google announced the beta launch of the Google Container Registry for its Cloud Platform. This new service allows developers to host, share and manage their private Docker container repositories on the company’s cloud computing platform. By default, Docker offers its own public images registry so developers can quickly install anything from a basic unadorned Ubuntu machine to servers that have already been set up to run WordPress, mongoDB, Hadoop or virtually any other server package you can think of. Many businesses have no interest in publishing their containers to a public repository, of course. They can run their own private repositories or use services like Quay.io that offer this feature as a cloud-based service. At its core, that’s what Google’s Container Registry does, too, but with a focus on Google’s own cloud computing platform.



12.12.14. Google Cloud Platform now supports server-side software for Windows. Google introduced Microsoft License Mobility for Google Cloud Platform that means Google’s customers can move their existing Microsoft server application software licenses (SQL Server, SharePoint, Exchange Server, and so on) from on-premises to Google Cloud Platform without any additional Microsoft software licensing fees. This makes the transition to Google’s cloud easier, and it also lets customers who prefer to purchase perpetual licenses to continue to do so. Besides Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter Edition is now available to all Google Cloud Platform customers in beta on Google Compute Engine. This option can be interesting for enterprises that want to mitigate risk in the cloud, and move some of their workloads from Azure to an alternate platform – in this case, Google cloud.



05.11.14. Google Cloud Platform slashes prices, adds containers, VPN support. During its Cloud Platform conference Google announced new products for its Google Cloud Platform. The first - service called Google Container Engine that lets businesses move from managing application components running on individual virtual machines to portable Docker containers that are scheduled into a managed compute cluster for you. Another addition is App Engine with auto-scaling support, Cloud SDK integration and support for runtimes built on Docker containers. Other rollouts include carrier interconnect with partners like Verizon and VPN support, starting in early 2015. This will let users keep apps and data in-house and using the public cloud for other tasks.  Google also slashed the prices for its Cloud Platform that should make both large and small-scale business partners happy. In addition to a 10% drop in pricing last month, here's a look at the latest cuts: BigQuery Storage falls almost 25%; PD Snapshots is down about 80%. Meanwhile, Disk SSD storage is cut nearly in half; and the price of large Cloud SQL instances dropped 25%.



2013. Now you can use Google App Engine to host your company website. Google App Engine added support for PHP - the language on which 90% of websites are created. So now you can move your corporate website to this cloud platform. Why is it better than the regular hosting that you currently use? First, GAE provides free quotas: 1GB for file and data storage and 1Gb of traffic per day. So for most small business websites this hosting will be free. For large companies that have websites with big attendance - the cost would be almost the same as with regular hosting. But with GAE they can be sure that their sites work reliably, because GAE - is the platform on which Google's own services work and it can withstand heavy loads and even natural disasters. In addition to website hosting, the PHP support on Google App Engine may help to grow more SaaS services. Because now the large army of PHP-developers will get the opportunity to start for free and attract customers with the reliable platform.



2013. Google Compute Engine is available for all. Google launched its cloud IaaS platform Google Compute Engine a year ago, and then we called it the very strong competitor for Amazon Web Services. But the problem was that during this year the platform was available only for selected users (who paid $400/month for Google's Gold-support). Yesterday Google Compute Engine has become available to everyone, so let's get ready to rumble. With the public launch Google has added several new features. In particular, advanced routing - to create gateways and VPN servers, and enable you to build applications that span your local network and Google’s cloud, support for PHP in Google App Engine. Unlike AWS, Google introduced per-minute billing for the virtual servers (instead of per-hour). The pricing starts at $0.02/hour for a shared-core server. The video shows how you can create linux-server with the required parameters in 30 seconds on Google Compute Engine.


Google App Engine for Business
2011. Google killed App Engine for Business. Last month, at the Google I/O conference, Google announced changes in GAE pricing, and caused panic among the developers. Without going into details, we'll just say that the developers initially incorrectly calculated the new fees, and only after Google's clarification post, it became clear that the prices would jump, but not so much. However, in the shadow of this panic another small announcement was unnoticed - the enterprise version of Google App Engine, launched a year ago - was closed. This does not mean that Google is no longer positioning its PaaS platform for business. Most of the features of the enterprise version (99.95% SLA, support for SSL, SQL, Spring framework) will be soon implemented in the basic version. However, this means that Google has done a lot of mistakes with the PaaS platform and currently loosing the game in competition with Microsoft, Salesforce, Amazon, VMWare.


Google App Engine
2010. Google partners with VMWare to adopt GAE for Enterprise. In response to the recent launch of VMForce, Google today announced the upcoming version of its cloud platform for enterprise users - Google App Engine for Business. Until now, GAE was actually not suitable for hosting enterprise applications. First, GAE does not provides enterprise-ready support, security and service level guarantees. Besides, it supports only one database - Big Table, which is not used in existing business applications, and locks clients into one platform. The enterprise version of GAE, which is scheduled for 4 quarter of 2010, will fix these issues. Corporate customers will be offered a premium support, 99.9% SLA, administration panel for managing security policies. In addition, GAE will add support for SSL and SQL databases. Instead of difficult-to-forecast scheme of payment for computer resources, the clients will pay a flat rate - $8/month for app user.