Google App Engine vs Windows Azure


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Google App Engine
Google App Engine lets you run web applications on Google's infrastructure. App Engine applications are easy to build, easy to maintain, and easy to scale as your traffic and data storage needs grow. With App Engine, there are no servers to maintain: You just upload your application, and it's ready to serve your users.
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Windows Azure
Windows Azure is an open and flexible cloud platform that enables you to quickly build, deploy and manage applications across a global network of Microsoft-managed datacenters. You can build applications using any alternative language, tool or framework. And you can integrate your public cloud applications with your existing IT environment.
Comparing Google App Engine vs Windows Azure is like comparing apples to oranges. Because your business is unique and nobody except you can decide, which is better for your company. But we can add some fun to your research and suggest some new comparison parameters.

Let's start with videos. We think that Windows Azure has better video than Google App Engine



Ok, now let's compare the UI. Looks like Windows Azure has more user-friendly interface than Google App Engine because it's bigger. At least on our screenshots


To compare the popularity of the solutions we counted how many alternatives people search for each of them on the Internet. And it turns out that Windows Azure is more popular than Google App Engine

Now let's look at the recent activities of our competitors:

- Google App Engine gets a firewall (in 2017)
- Microsoft launched new archival storage option for Azure (in 2017)
- Microsoft launches new tools to help enterprises move to its Azure cloud (in 2017)
- Google App Engine now supports all programming languages (in 2017)
- Following SAP and Oracle, IBM jumps to Microsoft Azure (in 2014)
- Microsoft Azure appliance makes comeback (in 2014)
- Microsoft and Docker team up to make containers play nice on Windows Server and Azure (in 2014)
- Microsoft Azure now also supports Google's Kubernetes (in 2014)
- Microsoft unveils Azure DocumentDB, a NoSQL database as a service (in 2014)
- Microsoft improves Windows Azure security with enhanced encryption (in 2014)

Looks like Windows Azure was recently more active than Google App Engine (at least in our news). We also found some news, in which Google App Engine and Windows Azure meet head to head:

2017 - Google App Engine now supports all programming languages. Windows Azure keeps calm


Google launched the new version of its platform-as-a-service for building application backends App Engine.The big news is that App Engine now supports any programming language, so a developer can create the app in whatever language they are comfortable using. Google sees this as a game changer, making the platform more open, which is a big theme with the company as it transitions to try and lure enterprise customers to Google Cloud Platform in general. In the previous version there was a limited set of runtime libraries and once you built an application, it was very difficult to take it out of Google. The company has indicated that part of its philosophy on being open means making it easy to move and avoid lock-in, even if that means leaving Google Cloud Platform.

2014 - Microsoft unveils Azure DocumentDB, a NoSQL database as a service. Google App Engine keeps calm


Microsoft is expanding its Azure platform again, this time rolling out a NoSQL database service Azure DocumentDB. As far as other cloud-provider-developed services go, DocumentDB sounds a lot more like Google’s similarly understated Cloud Datastore service than it does Amazon Web Services’ DynamoDB, which is actually more like a key-value store than a document database. Additional new products as part of the new Microsoft Data Platform include Azure Search and fully managed HBase as part of Microsoft’s HDInsight Hadoop service. It’s the kind of innovation Microsoft needs to focus on if it’s going to lure new developers and really compete in the cloud.

2010 - Windows Azure - available. Google Apps Store - soon.

Windows Azure
Today Microsoft has officially opened its cloud platform Windows Azure. It's a cloud for deploying SaaS services and hosting enterprise applications, that provides Microsoft-focused infrastructure and development tools. However, Azure also supports PHP, MySQL, Ruby on Rails, Python, Java, Eclipse and Zend. The main Azure advantage over Amazon Web Services and Rackspace Cloud is the high level of automation, allowing developers to focuse on their applications, rather than on the infrastructure. In addition, this platform enables to integrate hosted apps with the local IT infrastructure with the help of SOAP, REST and XML (thus supporting Microsoft's S+S strategy). The cost of using Windows Azure - is lower than the cost of Windows-infrastructure, built on Amazon.

Also today Wall Street Journal reported that Google will open an application marketplace for Google Apps in March. As you know, something like this already exists (Google Solutions Marketplace), but its not very suitable and supposes separate payments for third-party providers. The new Google App Store will allow to easily add apps to your account and pay to Google for them (and Google will pay to the developers. It is rumored, that developers will get about 70%). In addition recently Google Apps Standard Edition users were allowed to automate some tasks in their online office suite using the Google Apps Script.