Google Compute Engine vs Windows Azure


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Google Compute Engine
Run your large-scale computing workloads on Linux virtual machines hosted on Google's infrastructure. Use world class data centers that provide unparalleled performance for your computing needs. Easily scale to tens of thousands of cores on infrastructure designed for large-scale computing.
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Windows Azure
Windows Azure is an open and flexible cloud platform that enables you to quickly build, deploy and manage applications across a global network of Microsoft-managed datacenters. You can build applications using any alternative language, tool or framework. And you can integrate your public cloud applications with your existing IT environment.
Comparing Google Compute Engine vs Windows Azure is like comparing apples to oranges. Because your business is unique and nobody except you can decide, which is better for your company. But we can add some fun to your research and suggest some new comparison parameters.

Let's start with videos. We think that Windows Azure has better video than Google Compute Engine



Ok, now let's compare the UI. Looks like Windows Azure has more user-friendly interface than Google Compute Engine because it's bigger. At least on our screenshots


To compare the popularity of the solutions we counted how many alternatives people search for each of them on the Internet. And it turns out that Windows Azure is more popular than Google Compute Engine

Now let's look at the recent activities of our competitors:

- Following AWS, Google Compute Engine also moves to per-second billing (in 2017)
- Microsoft launched new archival storage option for Azure (in 2017)
- Microsoft launches new tools to help enterprises move to its Azure cloud (in 2017)
- Google Compute Engine adds Windows Server (in 2015)
- Following SAP and Oracle, IBM jumps to Microsoft Azure (in 2014)
- Microsoft Azure appliance makes comeback (in 2014)
- Microsoft and Docker team up to make containers play nice on Windows Server and Azure (in 2014)
- Microsoft Azure now also supports Google's Kubernetes (in 2014)
- Microsoft unveils Azure DocumentDB, a NoSQL database as a service (in 2014)
- Microsoft improves Windows Azure security with enhanced encryption (in 2014)

Looks like Windows Azure was recently more active than Google Compute Engine (at least in our news). We also found some news, in which Google Compute Engine and Windows Azure meet head to head:

2014 - Satya Nadella - new Microsoft CEO to stand out over Google Compute Engine



So, from now instead of the showman Steve Ballmer, techie-guy Satya Nadella will rule Microsoft. This video - his first interview as CEO. Nandelle is 46 years old, from which 22 years he worked at Microsoft. Before this appointment, Satya Nadella led the Cloud and Enterprise department. His time at MS oversaw a period of huge growth for Microsoft Business Services, too, growing that segment of the business from a $1.5 billion slice of pie to a $5 billion segment in just five years’ time. He was involved in the development of Windows Azure, Office 365 , Bing, SkyDrive, Xbox Live, Skype and Dynamics. In his first email to employees Nandella noted that Microsoft, primarily, should reimagine its mobile and cloud strategy. By the way, Bill Gates now leaves the Microsoft chairman position and (in his free time) will advise Nadella on the future technologies.

2013 - Google Compute Engine is available for all. Windows Azure should better react



Google launched its cloud IaaS platform Google Compute Engine a year ago, and then we called it the very strong competitor for Amazon Web Services. But the problem was that during this year the platform was available only for selected users (who paid $400/month for Google's Gold-support). Yesterday Google Compute Engine has become available to everyone, so let's get ready to rumble. With the public launch Google has added several new features. In particular, advanced routing - to create gateways and VPN servers, and enable you to build applications that span your local network and Google’s cloud, support for PHP in Google App Engine. Unlike AWS, Google introduced per-minute billing for the virtual servers (instead of per-hour). The pricing starts at $0.02/hour for a shared-core server. The video shows how you can create linux-server with the required parameters in 30 seconds on Google Compute Engine.